Blackstone Gorge mountain laurels

Delicate blossoms of mountain laurel return to the Blackstone Gorge each summer

Mountain laurels bloom every June in New England, but unless you are paying attention, you might miss the display. It doesn’t last very long. We saw loads of mountain laurel buds recently on a visit to New Hampshire, so I figured the Blackstone Gorge in Blackstone, MA might have some blooms to enjoy. I also checked in with a friend from the Blackstone Heritage Corridor, who confirmed that a trip to the Gorge to see blooming mountain laurel would be worthwhile (as though I needed an excuse!)

Clusters of buds are still developing, more blooms await!

And yes, mountain laurel blooms awaited when I headed out early in the morning, some flowers fully opened, while others are still intriguing buds, almost geometric in their shape. The foliage in the gorge is growing thick, and most of the mountain laurel flowers were at the top of branches, reaching for sunlight. I found a few cooperative displays that were easy to reach for taking photos, and other branches bearing blossoms over my head willingly flexed under my gentle coaxing to allow me better views of the delicate blooms.

Tiny bluets brighten the streamside along the Blackstone River

I went seeking mountain laurel, but as I wandered the area quite close to the trail head of the Gorge, the streamside bluets caught my eye. It’s been a good year for bluets. You may see large swathes of white against green grass on the medians along the highway. From a distance they appear to be tiny white flowers, but upon much closer examination, the blue tinge of their petals is revealed.

The modest tinge of blue is revealed when taking a closer look at these delicate summer flowers

I ventured out early to visit the Gorge, and while I saw two other cars in the lot that is just off County Street in Blackstone, these other visitors were long gone before I started my flower tour. And thus I enjoyed the mountain laurel in quiet solitude, the cool breeze from the fast flowing river helping discourage hungry mosquitos, although a few managed to get in a few bites when I was focused on flowers.

Summer and lower water allow visitors to get closer to the shoreline and impressive rocks that fill the Gorge

Nestled next to a spray of mountain laurel was a cluster of oak galls. These fragile balls dangle from oaks, and are the tree’s response to the irritant of eggs laid by certain wasps.

Oak galls on an oak sapling

Many blossoms of the mountain laurel remain to open, so there is still time to get over to enjoy a visit along the Blackstone River.

Mountain laurel buds offer their own beauty

This is a great place in every season, although it is on the far end of my scale for Easy Walks. The multiple stones in the trail, fairly steep slopes climbing up from the river, and roots washed out from the high water that rushes through the Gorge each spring make this a place where you really must watch your step.

The rocks and roots make for a challenging walk–watch your step!

But the rewards… The rewards are great in this narrow slice of nature along the river. If you miss the mountain laurel, there will be other changes to enjoy throughout the year whenever you’re able to make the time. Happy trails!

Looking upstream from the Gorge, along the Blackstone River

Marjorie

Marjorie Turner Hollman is a personal historian who loves the outdoors, and is the author of Easy Walks in Massachusetts, 2nd editionMore Easy Walks in Massachusetts, 2nd edition, and editor of Easy Walks and Paddles in the Ten Mile River Watershed. Just out is her latest book, Finding Easy Walks Wherever You Are. She has been a freelance writer for numerous local, regional, and national publications for the past 20+ years, has helped numerous families to save their stories, and has recorded multiple veterans oral histories, now housed at the Library of Congress. She is a co-author of the recent community history, Bellingham Now and Then.

6 Comments

Filed under Blog posts--Easy Walks

6 responses to “Blackstone Gorge mountain laurels

  1. Beautiful pictures! I’m missing seeing the Mountain Laurel blooms this year.

  2. Deb Meredith

    Hi Marjorie,Blackstone Gorge looks like an awesome place to go. Do you think it would be ok for a almost seven year old to go?        Thank You, DebbieAlso, Do you post lists of when you go do a group walk?

    • marjorie561

      The Blackstone Gorge is a great place for nimble 7 year olds who listen. If you have trouble getting yo9ur child to listen, there are places that could be of concern since there are steep drop offs overlooking the gorge. Right now no groups are offering walks because of Covid 19. Sad to say. If you sign up for the Blackstone Heritage Corridor’s newsletter, they will offer group walks of various types once it is ok to offer these. My facebook group page, Easy Walks Massachusetts, RI and nearby is a place I try to share any group events I see offered by various other groups in the area. For now, again, no group events are available. Roots in Nature is an Uxbridge based organization that offers group events for families, esp. very young children, outdoor based, from Worcester to Uxbridge to points farther east. Story walks are available in the area at various locations, my website blog https://marjorieturner.com/category/blog-posts-easy-walks/ has multiple posts about area story walks, books to read as you walk along the trail. Search using the term storywalk. Good luck and thanks for commenting.

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