Peek of small city life in Ireland

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Narrow streets, crowded sidewalks, and the ruins of the local monastery are all part of the market town of Ennis

Before we could get settled in our “home away from home” in Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare, we had a few necessary purchases to make, including cell phones that worked in Ireland, and maps we had been unable to attain prior to arriving in the country. From Spanish Point, where we’d spent the night, we headed to Ennis, a small city on our way to Ballyvaughan.

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The river Fergus flows right through the middle of Ennis

What we found there was a thriving market town with a river running through the center of town, and a remarkable Friary (Monastery) ruin right near the river.

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The Cloister, a local pub, has walls directly connected with the ruins of the old monastery, which was built in the 1400s

We were kindly directed for lunch to a small pub right next to the monastery, where we had a tasty meal in a quiet space. The Cloister’s walls are connected with the old monastery, and after enjoying our meal, we headed over to get a tour of the old buildings and learn a little history of the area.

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This portion of the monastery has no roof and is exposed to the elements. One portion has a modern roof that was built to preserve stone carvings that fill the church area

Walking through buildings that were erected in the 1400s puts American modern history into perspective.

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Inside the now protected church area, with a modern roof built to protect the stone carvings that fill the building

Yes, there were people living in America in the 1400s. But the multiple ancient structures that litter the countryside of Ireland gives some perspective about the degree of development and settlement that took place in Ireland long before anyone from Europe imagined traveled across the sea to the “New World.”

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Graves are part and parcel of this monastery–memorial stones are part of the flooring of the church, tucked into small corners, and placed in the yard just outside the building as well.

It is hard to imagine being able to keep warm (or dry!) in this wet climate. We climbed from one section of the friary to another, marveling at the small cells monks would have lived in, and trying to imagine how anyone kept dry.

We were grateful for the needed supplies we were able to obtain in Ennis, but even happier to get out of the crowds and onto the Burren.

Marjorie Turner Hollman

Marjorie Turner Hollman is a personal historian who loves the outdoors, and has completed two guides to Easy Walking trails in Massachusetts, “Easy Walks in Massachusetts 2nd edition,” and “More Easy Walks in Massachusetts.” A native Floridian, she came north for college and snow! Marjorie is a Certified Legacy Planner with LegacyStories.org, and is the producer of numerous veterans interviews for the Bellingham/Mendon Veteran’s History Project. http://www.marjorieturner.com

https://www.amazon.com/Easy-Walks-Massachusetts-2nd-Northbridge/dp/0989204340

http://tinyurl.com/MTH-More-easy-walks

 

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4 Comments

Filed under Blog posts--Easy Walks

4 responses to “Peek of small city life in Ireland

  1. Mary Chitty

    sounds like a wonderful trip. talkto you soon. love mg

    Mary Chitty MSLS Library Director & Taxonomist cell 617 861 7410 work 781 972 5416 Cambridge Healthtech, Needham MA http://www.genomicglossaries.com http://www.healthtech.com

    On Thu, Sep 7, 2017 at 10:51 AM, Marjorie Turner Hollman wrote:

    > marjorie561 posted: ” Before we could get settled in our “home away from > home” in Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare, we had a few necessary purchases to make, > including cell phones that worked in Ireland, and maps we had been unable > to attain prior to arriving in the country. From Spa” >

  2. Glad to see a glimpse of your trip! Lovely pix!

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